Our colleagues Susan Phillips, Stephen Friedberg and Andrew Dean wrote an article recently published on CFO.com.  “Sale-Leasebacks: Cash Out but Keep Control” advises on how to recover capital spent on property acquisition and improvements while continuing to occupy and operate the property. The article has been attached below. Continue Reading Sale-Leasebacks: Cash Out but Keep Control

Co-working centers and shared office space arrangements have exploded onto the commercial real estate scene recently and offer attractive alternatives for many small businesses, early stage start-ups, incubators and freelancers to more traditional long-term office leases or work-from-home arrangements.

The co-working model likely owes its meteoric rise to a shift in the workforce landscape at home and abroad. As more of the global workforce trends away from the traditional 9-5 office job and becomes increasingly independent, the co-working model has risen up to meet its evolving needs.

Continue Reading The Rise of Shared Work Spaces: Tips for the Unwary

Drone use in the real estate industry has exploded in recent months. The utility of drones in sales, marketing, construction, surveying, and inspection of real property is undeniable. There is vast potential for commercial use of drones in the real estate industry.  Their use has become very important in marketing strategies for brokers and developers, for inspection teams on construction projects and even for construction of high-rise cable structures. For example, drones can assist with moving dirt on a construction site using autonomous dump trucks, bulldozers, and excavators with real time mapping of the movement of soil and cement. Drones have also been extremely useful to surveyors in preparation of property reports and for owners who use drones for property security.

Continue Reading Droning Along: What Commercial Real Estate Property Owners Should Consider in the Drone Age

Recently, Law360 published our colleague Andrew A. Dean’s follow up to his previous article, “Negotiating Exclusive Use Provisions in Retail Leases.” This new article discusses how to address “rogue tenants,” the enforcement of an exclusive and whether continuous operation clauses should factor into the exclusive use provision when negotiating a retail lease on behalf of a tenant.

To read the full article, click here.

 

 

We are thrilled to announce that our colleague Andrew A. Dean was published in Law360. His article focuses on the more frequently discussed provisions in a retail lease – the tenant exclusive. He covers his own experience representing retail tenants and explains the fundamentals of a tenant exclusive from the perspective of the tenant and the various considerations to provide a healthy and robust advantage over competitors within the shopping center setting.

To access the full article, click here.

On September 15th, Mintz Levin, Cresa, and BDO will be hosting a Panel Discussion and Networking Reception in San Diego, California on the new changes to lease accounting rules. The FASB change will have profound impact on companies’ capital structures, leasing practices, and operational procedures. We invite you to a special evening event, where you will gain insight from our trusted advisors from legal, accounting, and real estate perspectives on the new FASB lease asset and liability reporting rules. For more information and to register, click here.

On April 15, 2016, the IRS released a memorandum addressing the impact of so-called “bad boy” guarantees on the characterization of underlying partnership debt as recourse vs. nonrecourse under Section 752 of the Internal Revenue Code. “Bad boy” guarantees are principally used in nonrecourse real estate mortgage financing transactions, especially those utilizing commercial mortgage-backed securities or securitized financing, to protect a lender against certain bad acts that are either in the control of the borrower or are customarily viewed as events where liability should be shifted to the borrower and its principals (such as fraud, material misrepresentation, and environmental issues).

Reversing its position from guidance issued earlier this year, the IRS concluded that the “bad boy” guarantees considered generally do not cause the underlying partnership obligation to fail to qualify as a nonrecourse liability of the partnership until such time as one of the “bad boy” events actually occurs (causing the guaranteeing partner to become liable for the partnership debt).

Importantly, IRS indicated that the applicable tax analysis is ultimately dependent on all the relevant facts and circumstances. Therefore, taxpayers should carefully review their financing arrangements in the context of their overall transaction and applicable circumstances, even if the terms of such financing arrangements appear similar to the terms covered by the said memorandum.

Click here to access the full alert.

Recently, our colleague Steve Friedberg published an article in AreaDevelopment on “Data Center Development and Financing Strategies”.  Co-authored by Gregory Burkart and Laca Wong-Hammond from Duff & Phelps, the article discusses industry-specific factors to consider when evaluating data center locations including power needs/costs, scalability, and security; and carefully analyzes financing strategies for these capital-intensive endeavors as well.

To access the article in full, click here.

The Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) is expected to finalize new lease accounting standards (“Standards”) within the coming months which will have very real consequences for owners and lessees alike. Under current accounting standards, a lease is classified as a “Capital Lease” or an “Operating Lease.” A capital lease is treated similarly to a loan; the asset is treated as being owned by the lessee and must be recorded as an asset on the lessee’s balance sheet. By contrast, an operating lease gives the lessee a right to use the owner’s asset without the requirement of including the lease on its balance sheet. The lessee never owns the asset and must return it to the owner after the lease ends. Most office building, retail, or other standard commercial leases are operating leases under the current standards.

The new Standards will, among other things, eliminate the above classification and instead classify most capital leases –including existing capital leases –as a “Type A Lease”, which will be accounted for in substantially the same manner as capital leases are accounted for under existing generally accepted accounting principals (GAAP), and most operating leases – including existing operating leases –as a “Type B Lease”, which will be accounted for in a manner similar to operating leases under existing GAAP, except that lessees will now be required to include lease obligations on their balance sheets increasing assets and liabilities. Shorter term leases, leases of 12 months or less, must also be included on balance sheet if, considering all relevant economic factors, the lessee is “reasonably certain” to exercise an option to extend the lease beyond 12 months. Continue Reading FASB Lease Accounting Changes

As a follow up to my colleague Allan Caggiano’s post here on the new 2016 ALTA/NSPS Land Title Survey Standards, the Planning & Zoning Resource Company (PZR) has recently circulated an important advisory on the practical effects of the new survey standards and the interaction between the surveyor and the zoning report that is typically provided by a third party like PZR. Continue Reading Important Changes Resulting from New ALTA/NSPS Land Title Survey Standards